Forum 2016 - Infrastructure Space - Detroit (Ruby Press)

345 344 governance, or, in other words, in- clusive and innovative collaboration. Too good to be true? No, this can be done—as Rebuild by Design ably demonstrates, we’ve already begun to make this a reality. 1. World Water Assessment Programme, The United Nations World Water Devel- opment Report 4: Managing Water under Uncertainty and Risk (Paris: UNESCO, 2012). 2. United Nations Development Programme, Human Development Report 2007/2008 (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007), http://hdr.undp.org/sites/default/files/re- ports/268/hdr_20072008_en_complete. pdf 3. World Water Assessment Programme, The United Nations World Water Devel- opment Report 4: Managing Water under Uncertainty and Risk . (Paris: UNESCO, 2012). 4. Ibid. 5. Stephane Hallegatte, Colin Green, Robert J. Nicholls, and Jan Corfee-Morlotm “Future flood losses in major coastal cities,” Nature Climate Change 3 (Nature Publishing Group: 2013). 6. Adaptation Committee, Institutional Arrangements for National Adaptation Planning and Implementation (UNFCCC, 2015), https://unfccc.int/files/adaptation/ application/pdf/ adaption_commitee_pub- lication_-_web_high.pdf writes about seeing the Nile’s sedi- ment over “a day’s journey” at sea, an observation that led him to conclude that Egypt was once a gulf and that the river, over thousands of years, made it land. Egypt, he famously wri- tes, is the gift of the river. An estuary, in contrast, does not layer as dramatic a history as the del- ta, perhaps because it allows the sea, with its affinity for erasure, to have more of a say. Indeed, some choose to define an estuary as a body of wa- ter through which rivers enter the sea, in comparison to a delta, a landmass of alluvium made by a roving, dividing, and extending river. Certainly, estua- ries allow the sea to come inland, its tides operating a scale of salinity that varies diurnally, at times exceptio- nally, with storms and sea surges on one side and the river on the other. A number of beings reside in this dyna- mic transition, adapted to or perhaps naturally tuned to accommodating its variabilities, or at least a range of them. This difference between a delta and an estuary, however, is articulated in a particular moment when a river, defined as “flowing water in a channel with defined banks,” can be assumed to exist. 1 What if the chosen moment is in rain when water is everywhere rather than somewhere, when the banks of channels are blurred, even erased, when there is no clear directi- onality of water by which to call out a flow? Here, rain does more than chal- lenge a difference in the way rivers meet the sea; it says that rivers are products of choice in the extended What are the implications for infrastructure if “the coast” is considered not as a fixed point on a map but rather—as it is in reality— as something movable, ever shifting and changing? What if designers cast anchor in another moment of the water cycle, such as precipitation? Anuradha Mathur and Dilip da Cunha explore such an approach, with reference to the Bengal Delta of South Asia and Chesapeake Bay, Virginia. Challenging the Moment of Flows A delta and an estuary are two ways by which rivers meet the sea. In deltas, rivers dominate the sea, depo- siting sediment and, in the process, extending land. The conditions are such that upon meeting the sea, the river slows down, dropping its load of sediment, dividing and spreading, and in the process constructing ground in the form of the Greek letter ∆. The layers of silt upon silt conceal a past, which makes it not surprising that some have attributed the term delta to Herodotus, the “father of history.” This keen observer of the ancient world Designing the Coast in the Moment of Rain Anuradha Mathur and Dilip da Cunha What are the implications for infrastructure if “the coast” is considered not as a fixed point o a map but rather—as it is in reality— as something movable, ever shifting and changing? What if designers cast anchor in another moment of the water cycle, such as precipitation? Anurad a M thur and Dilip da Cunha explore such an approach, with reference to the Bengal Delta of South Asia and Chesapeake Bay, Virginia.

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