Forum 2016 - Infrastructure Space - Detroit (Ruby Press)

217 216 1. See Gérard Wajcman, Fenêtre: Chro- niques du regard et de l’intime (Lagras- se: Verdier, 2004), 439–41; and Geor- ges Teyssot, “Windows and Screens: A Topology of the Intimate and the Extima- te,” Log , no. 18 (2010): 75–88. 2. Wajcman, Fenêtre , 439. 3. Georges Duby, “Ouverture” in Histoire de la vie privée , ed. Philippe Ariès and Georges Duby, vol. 2, De l’Europe féoda- le à la Renaissance (Paris: Seuil, 1985), 19–24. 4. Ibid., 22–23. 5. Edward Q. Keasbey, The Law of Electric Wires in Streets and Highways (Chi- cago: Callaghan and Company, 1900) reprinted by Biblio Bazaar in 2009, 1. 6. Ibid, 2. 7. Ibid, 2. 8. François Béguin, “Savoirs de la ville et de la maison au début du 19ème siècle,” in Politiques de l’habitat , 1800–1850, ed. Michel Foucault (Paris: Corda, 1977), 211–324. 9. Ibid., 247–51. 10. Ibid., 317–24. 11. Stephen Kern, The Culture of Time and Space , 1880–1918 (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1983), 187; and Christoph Asendorf, “Telefon: ‘Pier- cing the Shell of Privacy,’” Arch+ , nos. 191/192 (March 2009): 118–23. 12. Beatriz Colomina, Privacy and Publicity: Modern Architecture as Mass Media (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1994), 7–11. 13. Conversely, according to Stephen Kern, during the nineteenth century, a number of inventions such as the microphone, in 1877, “pierced the shell of privacy.” The author refers to Frank Lloyd Wright’s “prairie-style” home, whose interior was developed as a shelter from the outside. This conception was part of a broad re- consideration of the relationship between public and private sphere. Kern, Culture of Time and Space , 187. 14. Evelyne Patlagean, “Bysance Xème-XIè- me siècle,” in Histoire de la vie privée , ed. Philippe Ariès and Georges Duby, vol. 1, De l’Empire romain à l’an mil (Paris: Seuil, 1985), 547. 15. Ibid., 547–48; and Spiro Kostof, A His- tory of Architecture: Settings and Ritu- als (New York: Oxford University Press, 1985), 361. See also Terence Riley, The Un-Private House (New York: Museum of Modern Art, 1999), 10. 16. Riley, The Un-Private House , 11; and Roger Chartier, “Les pratiques de l’écrit,” in Histoire de la vie privée , ed. Philippe Ariès and Georges Duby, vol. 3, De la Renaissance aux Lumières (Paris: Seuil, 1986), 165–67. 17. Raymond Williams, Television: Tech- nology and Cultural Form (London: La Fontana, 1974). 18. Peter Sloterdijk, Ecumes: Spheres III, trans. Olivier Mannoni (Paris: Hachette Litteratures, 2005), 443. My translation. 19. See Caroline A. Jones, ed., Sensorium: Embodied Experiences, Technology, and Contemporary Art (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2006), 5–49. Image Sources: Fig. 1: John Mills, The Magic of Communi- cation (American Telephone and Telegraph Company, 1937). Fig. 2, 4: AT&T Archives and History Center. Fig. 5: Warshaw Collection of Business Ame- ricana, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution. Fig. 4: James Robb, The Biography of Tele- phone. AT&T Archives and History Center. Figs. 6, 7: George H. Clark Radioana Col- lection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution Fig. 5: Warshaw Collection of Business Ame- ricana, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution. While the transition towards more sustainable energy systems is a pursuit across all scales, Sven Stremke argues that the regional scale is the most appropriate for the planning and design of sustainable “energy landscapes”—in which infrastructure manifests as the physical artifacts of this transition. Before the era of fossil fuels, there was a direct relation between spatial organization of the physical environ- ment and energy sources. Renewable energies shaped landscapes and vice versa. Over the past century or two, however, we’ve become addicted to an ever-increasing amount of fossil fuels while most of us have lost sight of the energy infrastructure that is necessary to exploit, process, store, and transport crude oil, natural gas, and their derivatives. More recently, we can observe that the reintroduc- tion of renewable energy has serious implications for the spatial organiza- tion and appearance of the physical environment. I want to explore here the regional planning and design of sustainable “energy landscapes”—a physical environment (or territory) that can evolve on the basis of locally available renewable energy sources without compromising landscape quality, biodiversity, food production, and other life-supporting ecosystem services. The first objective for the designer of energy landscapes is the ener- gy-conscious organization of land use, since both energy supply and demand are influenced by the spa- tial organization of the environment. The second objective is to design resilient infrastructure that can trans- port and transmit energy of different qualities effectively—district heating networks, for example, allow the use of residual heat from power plants. The third objective is to increase the assimilation of energy by means of renewable energy technology. On this point, both the spatial claims and the appearance of renewable energy technologies ought to be taken into account. A full transition to renewable ener- gy is expected to take decades and necessitate energy-conscious inter- ventions that range in scale from the architectural (e.g., heat pumps) to the continental (e.g., gas networks). Spa- tial planners, landscape architects, and other environmental designers working at the intermediate scales are challenged both by the long-term nature of this transition and the spa- tial complexity of energy landscapes. Until very recently, research within spatial planning was limited to energy use in relation to commuting and the Energy Transition at the Regional Scale: Building Sustainable Energy Landscapes Sven Stremke While the transition towards more sustainable energy systems is a pursuit across all scales, Sven Stremke argues that the reg onal scale is the most appropriate for the planning and design of sustainable “energy landscapes”—in which infrastructure manifests as the physical artifacts of this transition.

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